Search results for: monetary policy

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ECB asset purchases — Bazooka or damp squib?

With inflation expectations declining to the levels that preceded the recent shift in policy, should the ECB and the financial markets be worried? In our view, the ECB probably won’t be wholly impressed by the reaction of inflation expectations to recently announced measures, and will be keeping a close eye on favored measures.

Tagged with: Economy, Global Economy, Markets

Is Europe heading for Japanese-style deflation?

Although there are many differences that should ensure that the eurozone does not follow Japan‘s fate, policymakers will need to act forcefully if the risk of deflation intensifies. While the euro area appears to be on track to avert deflation in the short term, many euro countries are “one crisis away from deflation.”
The European Central Bank (ECB) claims to be ahead of the game, but policy needs to be more pro-active.

Tagged with: Global Economy, Investing

Inflation — The usual suspects

Four factors figure empirically into how and why inflation moves: (1) commodity prices, (2) spare capacity, (3) changes in exchange rates, and (4) monetary policy. These same factors argue for a gradual recovery in U.S. inflation in the year ahead, which could be a headwind for high-quality fixed-income returns.

Tagged with: Economy, Fixed Income

Making sense of negative interest rates

Buying bonds at negative rates is a guarantee of losing money in nominal terms.
Central banks must keep real rates low to help their economies reach a self-sustaining growth path. Investors should focus on asset classes that benefit from this growth rather than providing the free money to support it.

Tagged with: Equities, Fixed Income, Global Perspectives, Investing

We remain dollar bulls given the likelihood of superior U.S. economic performance

We believe the weakness in the U.S. dollar is likely to remain temporary and that we can use the current correction to rebuild our dollar risk position. We expect the U.S. economy to outperform because it has fewer structural rigidities and should enjoy greater long-term productivity gains than comparable economies.

Tagged with: Global Economy, Monetary Policy, U.S. Economy

India’s new government fires investor enthusiasm

The landslide victory of the pro-business Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has transformed investor sentiment towards India. As the new government puts its stamp on policy, it will create investment opportunities not only in the domestic economy but also in sectors exposed to government-led reform.

Tagged with: Global Economy, Investing

In search of bond market liquidity

Liquidity in bond markets does not portend a crisis but does raise the risk of one as policymakers flirt with tighter monetary policy. The only sensible approach is to recognize the lack of liquidity, manage it and ensure there is proper compensation for illiquidity.

Tagged with: Fixed Income

Interest rates — Farewell, liquidity trap

The U.S. Treasury market as a whole has returned +1% annualized since the end of 2012 (and +0.5% annualized since the low in 10-year yields in July 2012). Because of imminent Fed rate hikes and depressed yield levels, prospective returns look no better today.

Tagged with: Economy, Fixed Income, Investing

A creature is stirring

Last week’s news suggests that the center of the FOMC continues to see interest rate hikes in the middle of next year as most appropriate. December 17 looks like a natural time to begin signaling the possibility of rate hikes to financial markets—an eventuality for which bond investors do not look prepared.

Tagged with: Economy, Fixed Income

To infinity and beyond!

Financial markets are now questioning the time limit on an infinite QE policy and what lies beyond its expiration. While volatility and corrections are unpleasant, they can motivate investors to focus on fundamental issues such as capital investment and labor productivity.

Tagged with: Economy, Investing, Markets
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About Us

Columbia Threadneedle Investments is a leading global asset management group that provides a broad range of actively managed investment strategies and solutions for individual, institutional and corporate clients around the world. With more than 2,000 people, including over 450 investment professionals based in North America, Europe and Asia, we manage $506 billion†† of assets across developed and emerging market equities, fixed income, asset allocation solutions and alternatives.

††In U.S. dollars as of March 31, 2015. Source: Ameriprise Q1 Earnings Release. Includes all assets managed by entities in the Columbia and Threadneedle groups of companies. Contact us for more current data.